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A software module called an XML processor is used to read XML documents and provide access to their content and structure. Edited by Tim Bray (Textuality and Netscape), Jean Paoli (Microsoft), C. Sperberg-Mc Queen (University of Illinois at Chicago and Text Encoding Initiative), and Eve Maler (Sun Microsystems, Inc. The XML applications and announced industry initiatives listed below have not been evaluated according to any serious criteria for quality and genuineness.

It is assumed that an XML processor is doing its work on behalf of another module, called the application. is the principal document governing the XML standard. Since the various specifications documents for XML/XLink/XSL are still in some flux, it would often be unfair or difficult to make such a judgment.

Markup encodes a description of the document's storage layout and logical structure. See now the separate document for references to SGML/XML FAQs.

XML provides a mechanism to impose constraints on the storage layout and logical structure. This document cites the earlier versions of the XML FAQ (1.5, 1.4, 1.3, 1.2, 1.1) and early translations into Japanese, Spanish, and Korean.

Such exchange is facilitated by schemas defining the characteristics of classes of objects.

The objects can be syntactic constructs such as are used in XML instances, or may be more abstract such as are found in databases, information models or directed, labeled graphs.

This specification describes the required behavior of an XML processor in terms of how it must read XML data and the information it must provide to the application." [adapted from the Proposal] Valid XML documents are designed to be valid SGML documents, but XML documents have additional restrictions. Several other W3C specifications are also critical to the understanding and implementation of XML as it is currently used. Editors: Tim Bray (Textuality and Netscape), Jean Paoli (Microsoft), and C. Sperberg-Mc Queen (University of Illinois at Chicago). Obviously, many of these application areas provide exemplary models, having unquestioned integrity and high quality.

The W3C XML WG has published a technical NOTE providing a "detailed comparison of the additional restrictions that XML places on documents beyond those of SGML": see for the details. (XML Co-editor); Dan Connolly, W3C; Steve De Rose, INSO; Dave Hollander, HP; Eliot Kimber, Highland; Eve Maler, Arbor Text; Tom Magliery, NCSA; Murray Maloney, Muzmo and Grif; Makoto Murata, Fuji Xerox Information Systems; Joel Nava, Adobe; Peter Sharpe, Soft Quad; John Tigue, Data Channel." Historically: The W3C SGML Editorial Review Board, as of November 5, 1996, had the following members: Jon Bosak, Sun ([email protected]), chair; Tim Bray, Textuality ([email protected]), editor; James Clark ([email protected]), technical lead; Dan Connolly ([email protected]), W3C contact; Steve De Rose, EBT ([email protected]), editor; Dave Hollander, HP ([email protected]); Eliot Kimber, Passage Systems ([email protected]); Tom Magliery, NCSA ([email protected]); Eve Maler, Arbor Text ([email protected]); Jean Paoli, Microsoft ([email protected]); Peter Sharpe, Soft Quad ([email protected]); C. These specifications are being developed by various working groups, sometimes as part of activity outside the sphere of the XML Activity. Some already play a vital role in profitable commercial enterprise.

It "defines the Document Object Model Level 2, a platform- and language-neutral interface that allows programs and scripts to dynamically access and update the content, structure and style of documents.XML was initially "developed by a W3C Generic SGML Editorial Review Board formed under the auspices of the W3 Consortium in 1996 and chaired by Jon Bosak of Sun Microsystems, with the very active participation of a Generic SGML Working Group also organized by the W3C." An XML WG (Working Group) under W3C served initially as an editorial board, which received input from an XML Special Interest Group.As of late 1998, the XML design effort was re-chartered under the direction of an XML Coordination Group and XML Plenary Interest Group to be carried out in five new XML working groups: XML Schema Working Group, XML Fragment Working Group, XML Linking Working Group (XLink and XPointer), XML Information Set Working Group, and XML Syntax Working Group.The NOTE also includes an SGML declaration which describes the constraints of XML applicable to an SGML parser. It is also to be expected that some early XML/XLink/XSL applications may be merely demonstrations, toys, proof-of-concept applications; still others might be naive or ill conceived.[local archive copy] [This paragraph is superseded by the technical NOTE 'NOTE-sgml-xml' referenced immediately above.] Features in SGML but not in XML include [as of November 5, 1996]: "Tag omission; The CONCUR, LINK, DATATAG, and SHORTREF features; The "&" connector in content models; Inclusions and exclusions in content models; CURRENT, CONREF, NAME, NAMES, NUMBER, NUMBERS, NUTOKEN, and NUTOKENS declarations for attributes; The NET construct; Abstract syntax; Capacities and quantities; Comments appearing within other markup declarations; Public Identifiers; Omission of quotes on attribute values." For a more recent/complete comparison of features, see the relevant section in the language specification, or "What else has changed between SGML and XML? As of December 1997, the current and former members of the XML WG are: "Jon Bosak, Sun (Chair); James Clark (Technical Lead); Tim Bray, Textuality and Netscape (XML Co-editor); Jean Paoli, Microsoft (XML Co-editor); C. It may be necessary to regard some of these ideas 'in draft' like some of the specifications documents themselves. [June 30, 1999] A 'TEI Lite DTD in XML' was made available from the TEI Web site.

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